Three great places to go skiing in Germany

There are several resorts in Germany for skiing. Of note are some great bunny mountains for those wanting to build their confidence, as well as the Kandahar run in Garmisch, which surprises everyone for how tricky it is for downhill ski fans.

Germany is a beginner and family skier’s secret bolthole, with many resorts just an hour away from Munich Airport and Munich Train Station, as well as many tiny towns and villages that no-one really knows about…

Q. Can you go skiing in Germany?

A. Yes! The Bavarian Alps have much to offer – and more so for the peaks and valleys that cross the border with Austrian ski resorts, where there are much bigger peaks to go skiing and ‘boarding in.

 

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Where to go skiing in Germany

 

1. Garmisch, Germany

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Garmisch - Skiing in Germany

Garmisch – or Garmisch-Partenkirchen by its full name – is a very well-known location with 45km of pistes, where a skier can kick off their skiing holiday, before tacking the Kandahar for the week, or whizzing around the four big peaks: the Hausberg, the Kreuzeck, the Alpspitze and the Zugspitze (“Trek Top”), which is the highest mountain in Germany. It casually relaxes itself across the Austria-Germany border and descends into Ehrwald in Austria.

The whole Garmisch area has lots of little pockets of (interestingly named, and) beautiful places to pepper your trip with if you wish. There is the Linderhof, an ex-royal palace open to the public, a glacier Höllental (Wetterstein) – great for trying our climbing in the Alps, and Eibsee, which is quite possibly the most instagrammable lake in all of Germany.

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2. Oberjoch, Germany

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Oberjoch - Skiing in Germany

Oberjoch Bad Hindelan is popular locally in a similar way that The Nevis Range is popular in Scotland, UK – the peaks are family-friendly, and the snow is good when travel costs are cheaper – in January and February. Of course, Oberjoch’s pistes aren’t as dizzying as they are elsewhere, but the slopes add up to a little range of 32km to choose from. While this is small, this number does makes Oberjoch much bigger compared to many tiny slopes dotted around Bavaria that literally centre around about 8 cabins and a few cafes (perfect if you’re on a serious hideaway holiday!). There is also a snow nursery for the smaller kids to meet and go sledding or learn skiing; and in the winter, Oberjoch welcomes a little troupe of horse-drawn carriages for couples wishing to live the actual Bavarian fairy tale.

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3. Oberstdorf, Germany

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Oberstdorf - Skiing in Germany

Oberstdorf’s range technically crosses over in Austria – some skiers will tell you that Oberstdorf is Austrian because that’s where the bigger footprints of the mountains are… But if your resort or chalet is in Oberstdorf proper, you are actually still in Germany – albeit, the most southern tip of Bavaria.

It’s much bigger than most people imagine it to be, with 130km of pistes to choose from, including the more challenging red runs – the Fellhorn and Walmendingerhorn mountains. Off-piste, you can explore another untouched 70km of mountain and crag – a place that hikers and climbers tend to make more use of in the summer.

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4. Feldberg, Germany

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Feldberg - Skiing in Germany

Feldberg is the name of the mountain and the village, located at the “end” of the famous Black Forest. It is sizeable in terms of the kinds of skiing areas that exist in Germany – there are 60km of slopes across the Feldberg and Seebuck mountains here (not including any off-piste shenanigans), which together make Feldberg a third bigger than Garmisch’s range in total, just for on-piste.

Feldberg has 36 slopes and 28 lifts – again, not massively known internationally, but a new year must-do in Germany, with lots of city folk rushing in during the Christmas and school holidays here. Feldberg is also the spiritual home of skiing in Germany – at least in the sense that in 1892, Germany’s first ever ski club was established on Feldberg mountain; and the first ski-in ski-out lodge in the country.

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Q. Which areas in Germany are popular for skiing?

A. Garmisch is probably the most famous ski resort in Germany, home of the country’s tallest mountains and most challenging downhill runs. Oberjoch and Oberstdorf are also well-known as Bavarian Alps wonderlands; the latter crossing over into Austria. Oberstdorf offers an impressive 80 miles of piste to explore, and a World-Cup ski track.

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